Three of a Theme: Sports Romance

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Since I’m currently reading From Lukov With Love, I wanted to talk about some other sporty romance novels that I’ve read in the (very distant) past. These books are chock full of clichés and incredibly corny, but they’re also funny, swoon-worthy, and so very entertaining!

  1. The Deal by Elle Kennedy

    It’s been so long since I’ve read this book, I don’t even have it listed. Basically, it’s about this girl Hannah who is crushing on this guy, so she makes a deal with the college hockey star. She tutors him to get his GPA up, and he helps her make this other guy jealous. Obviously, in tradition with most romance novels, they start liking each other.

  2. Scoring Wilder by R.S. Grey

    If you’re looking for something light and funny, I would definitely recommend Scoring Wilder. It’s about Kinsley, a soccer player who is preparing for Olympic tryouts, but is crushing on her hot professional soccer playing coach. Hilarity and sexiness ensues.

  3. Amour Amour by Krista and Becca Ritchie

    This is probably the only book between the three that I enjoyed for more than just the romance. In fact, this book almost made me want to join the circus (kidding, but not really). Thora dreams of being a professional acrobat, and tries out for her dream role in the acrobatic Vegas show Amour Amour, opposite the leading performer, Nikolai. I loved the romance, but more than that, I admired how dedicated Thora was to achieving her goals. She never gave up, despite everything that stood in her way.

Three of a Theme: Russia-Inspired Fairy Tale Retellings

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This week, I’ll be discussing a trend in my favorites shelf: Russia-inspired fantasy novels!

  1. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
  2. Uprooted by Naomi Novak
  3. Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente

Russia is a fascinating country, and I love the blend of Russian history with fantasy elements.

Read:

In The Bear and the Nightingale and The Girl in the Tower, it is very apparent how much research has been conducted by Katherine Arden on a period in Russian history that is little-known and poorly documented. She blends this historical context with Russian fairytales and the folklore of the time, to create a magical and believable world.

Uprooted is a fairytale version of Poland and Russia. It has a twist of Beauty and the Beast and Rapunzel, as well as hints of Slavic folklore. Naomi Novik has built a wonderful world through this clever mix of origin stories and has managed to make it feel like her own creation.

To Read:

I have yet to read Deathless, but I own a paperback copy and fully plan on reading this one over the next couple of weeks. This book mixes the Russian folklore story of Koschei the Deathless with historical events in the twentieth century. I’ve been told that this book contains some heavy topics, so I’m likely to wait until I’ve read something a little lighter (I’m still reeling from The Secret History).