Top 5 Tuesday: Books I Want to Reread

img_2290*Top 5 Tuesday is a meme hosted by Bionic Book Worm. A new topic is posted each week.


The Secret History by Donna Tartt

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Every once in awhile I come across a book that is so captivating and resonates so deeply with me, and I can’t put into words why. The Secret History was that kind of book. It’s a monster at almost 700 pages, but I still wanted to absorb every single word. I want to reread this someday so that I can pick up on all the things I may have missed the first time around. I can’t wait to revisit these fascinating characters and this remarkable story.

 


The Girl with All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

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It’s been a couple years since I read this book, and I remember it being so suspenseful and creepy! I’ve kind of been on a horror/apocalyptic kick lately and I would love to read this book again.

 

 

 


Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

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I have a confession: I still haven’t read Crooked Kingdom. At this point, I’m not sure if I would even remember enough important details from Six of Crows to thoroughly enjoy the sequel. I’d actually like to get caught up on all the Grishaverse books before King of Scars comes out, so hopefully I find time to reread the original trilogy. Anyway, this book is a masterpiece, and I know I’ll enjoy it just as much the second time around as I did the first.

 


The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

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This book is a glorious masterpiece and I adore it so much. From the lovable protagonist to the atmospheric winter setting to the intricate weaving of magical Russian folklore, the Winternight series is everything I want and more. The final book doesn’t come out until January (!!) so I’ll have plenty of time to re-immerse myself in this world before then.

 


Ten Tiny Breaths by K.A. Tucker

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The story is heartbreaking and the romance is swoon-worthy. I loved Ten Tiny Breaths so much when I read it several years ago, so I almost want to reread it just to see if I would feel the same way now. Then again, K.A. Tucker has released many books since this one and I have magpie tendencies, so I’ll probably pick up those first.

 

 


 

Review: The Secret History by Donna Tartt

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Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality their lives are changed profoundly and for ever.


Title: The Secret History
Author: Donna Tartt
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Publisher: Vintage Books
Source: Paperback
Release Date: September 11, 1992
Rating: ★★★★★

I’m a little late on this one.

And when I say late, I mean about 26 years late. This book came out before I was born. When it was released, it was critically acclaimed and widely considered one of the best books of the 90’s. I’ve been hearing of this book for quite some time, so I decided to jump on the bandwagon and give it a try.

Honestly, I don’t know how to review this book. It’s the kind of story that stays with you well after you’ve finished reading it. It tells the dark and haunting story of a close-knit group of college students that commit the murder of their best friend. The murder isn’t a secret; in fact, it’s revealed in the first chapter. This book focuses more on the buildup and subsequent aftermath of the event.

The Greek program at Hampden College is a very small handful of students that are exclusively selected by the program’s mysterious professor, Julian Morrow. Richard is an outsider who gradually becomes a member of this group. Because he is from a different world (he is a poor California boy with distant parents, while the rest are pampered and wealthy New England elitists), we are given an interesting perspective on the events that unfold. None of the characters are particularly likable, but the story is compelling and kept me turning the pages to find out what happens next.

The Secret History is a slow-burn psychological thriller about intellectual arrogance, obsession and insecurity, and the lengths that people will go to cover up a murder. This is the kind of book that I could reread again and again, and always find something that I missed the first time.

I’ve never read anything like it, and I’m not sure that I ever will again.

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Sunday Spent in Bed With…The Secret History by Donna Tartt

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Don’t we all like to waste our Sundays curled up in bed with a good book? Maybe that’s just me. Honestly though, there’s no other way I’d rather spend a day off.

On a whim, I decided to buy a paperback copy of The Secret History by Donna Tartt from the Book Depository. The package arrived three days ago, and I immediately dove into it. I’ve seen this book everywhere, but I’ve never bothered to pick it up. Clearly, I’ve been missing out.

This book is a 600 page monster, and it’s taking me longer to read than most books typically do. I think this is partially because of Donna Tartt’s writing style, but also because I want to absorb every word. The story has a dark, haunting quality to it, and I can’t help but feel like there are clues on every page. I’ve been told that this story isn’t a whodunit, but rather a whydunit, since the murder is revealed in the very first chapter. The characters don’t seem very likable, and yet, you can’t help but like them anyway. I can’t wait to see how the story unfolds!

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I feel like this one may take me awhile, especially since I have a few Netgalley ARC’s to read and review in the meantime. For today, I have no obligation other than to snuggle up in bed and devour this world that Donna Tartt has created.